Tag Archives: Food and drink

Food and Water in an Emergency

If you’re visiting our blog chances are pretty good you already own water filters, emergency food supplies and a bugout bag or survival kit. If not please visit the DayOne Gear Store. There are many resources with tips and tricks to help you survive an emergency but we wanted to review some basics so you and your family are safe when disaster strikes.

Prepare your family for an emergency

The CDC offers these tips for preparing for a disaster or emergency:

Prepare an Emergency Food Supply

Keep foods that:

  • Have a long storage life
  • Require little or no cooking, water, or refrigeration, in case utilities are disrupted
  • Meet the needs of babies or other family members who are on special diets
  • Meet pets’ needs
  • Are not very salty or spicy, as these foods increase the need for drinking water, which may be in short supply

How To Store Emergency Food

  • A disaster can easily disrupt the food supply at any time, so plan to have at least a 3-day supply of food on hand.
  • When storing food, it is not necessary to buy dehydrated or other types of emergency food. Canned foods and dry mixes will remain fresh for about 2 years.
  • Certain storage conditions can enhance the shelf life of canned or dried foods. The ideal location is a cool, dry, dark place. The best temperature is 40 to 60°F. Keep foods away from ranges or refrigerator exhausts. Heat causes many foods to spoil more quickly.
  • Keep food away from petroleum products, such as gasoline, oil, paints, and solvents. Some food products absorb their smell.
  • Protect food from rodents and insects. Items stored in boxes or in paper cartons will keep longer if they are heavily wrapped or stored in airtight containers.
  • Date all food items. Use and replace food before it loses freshness.

Preparing Food

Preparing food after a disaster or emergency may be difficult due to damage to your home and loss of electricity, gas, and water. Having the following items available will help you to prepare meals safely:

  • Cooking utensils
  • Knives, forks, and spoons
  • Paper plates, cups, and towels
  • A manual can- and bottle-opener
  • Heavy-duty aluminum foil
  • Gas or charcoal grill; camp stove
  • Fuel for cooking, such as charcoal. (CAUTION: Never burn charcoal indoors. The fumes are deadly when concentrated indoors.)

Prepare an Emergency Water Supply

  • Store at least 1 gallon of water per day for each person and each pet. You should consider storing more water than this for hot climates, for pregnant women, and for persons who are sick.
  • Store at least a 3-day supply of water for each person and each pet (try to store a 2-week supply if possible).
  • Observe the expiration date for store-bought water; replace other stored water every six months.
  • Store a bottle of unscented liquid household chlorine bleach to disinfect your water and to use for general cleaning and sanitizing.

Note: Caffeinated drinks and alcohol dehydrate the body, which increases the need for drinking water.

Water Containers (Cleaning and Storage)

Unopened commercially bottled water is the safest and most reliable emergency water supply.

Use of food-grade water storage containers, such as those found at surplus or camping supply stores, is recommended if you prepare stored water yourself.

Before filling with safe water, use these steps to clean and sanitize storage containers:

  1. Wash the storage container with dishwashing soap and water and rinse completely with clean water.
  2. Sanitize the container by adding a solution made by mixing 1 teaspoon of unscented liquid household chlorine bleach in one quart of water.
  3. Cover the container and shake it well so that the sanitizing bleach solution touches all inside surfaces of the container.
  4. Wait at least 30 seconds and then pour the sanitizing solution out of the container.
  5. Let the empty sanitized container air-dry before use OR rinse the empty container with clean, safe water that already is available.

Avoid using the following containers to store safe water:

  • Containers that cannot be sealed tightly
  • Containers that can break, such as glass bottles
  • Containers that have ever been used for any toxic solid or liquid chemicals (includes old bleach containers)
  • Plastic or cardboard bottles, jugs, and containers used for milk or fruit juices

For proper water storage,

  • Label container as “drinking water” and include storage date.
  • Replace stored water that is not commercially bottled every six months.
  • Keep stored water in a place with a fairly constant cool temperature.
  • Do not store water containers in direct sunlight.
  • Do not store water containers in areas where toxic substances such as gasoline or pesticides are present.

During an emergency learn how to Make Water Safe and about Finding Emergency Water Sources.

Top 10 Must-Have Tools for the Kitchen

     A few years ago, I was all about Food Network. I watched every single show they made. I paid close attention tothe terminology they used, the ingredients they combined, and the kitchen tools they used.  Those kitchen tools?Yeah, I wanted them all. The juicers, the meat slicers, the panini press… I just had to have them!

     Then I paid closer attention. I looked at the basic tools they all used. These are the ones that really matter. Not everyone needs a shark skin grater or a donabe smoker, but everyone needs the ones I’m going to talk about in this article… so read on!

This article was written by Patrick from Survival At Home.

Get Your Gut In Shape: Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

I always wipe down the shopping cart handle with the handy sanitizing wipes at the grocery store. I’m doing my part in the war on germs being waged in our society. Anti-bacterial soap, anti-bacterial hand sanitizer are only the tip of our modern microorganism warhead. Pasteurized and irradiated food is a relatively new practice. Sterile is good, right?

Fermented foods have sustained humans for thousands of years. When it comes to our gut flora, exposure to bacteria is a good thing. Fermented foods offer the sterile gut a healthy dose of probiotics to help balance our intestinal flora. In a prolonged emergency or TEOTWAWKI event, the skill of fermentation will become very useful – even life saving. When the lights go out, a lot of sub 40 degree food will go to waste.

My sauerkraut will last for years if it had to. Around my house, it doesn’t stand a chance lasting a year.

Here’s my step-by-step process Down and Dirty Sauerkraut.

A.) Gather your ingredients. In this batch, I used one head of white cabbage, one head of red, and about 9 carrots, and some sea salt. You’ll need 2 or 3 wide mouth quart jars with lids. Always use glass to store the kraut to prevent acidic reactions with metal material. I used stainless steel pans to mix the kraut, but only leave it in long enough to mix it. You should really use non-reactive containers in the whole process.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

B.) Shred the cabbage or other vegetables you want to add to your kraut. I use a food processor for a down and dirty (quick) method. Some folks like to slice it with a knife to get the desired length on the kraut. If you’re fortunate, you own a cabbage shredder.

C.) Spread a layer (about an inch or so) into big container. Sprinkle some sea salt over the layer. How much? I don’t know. I don’t make stuff with exact recipes. You may also like to add a tablespoon of caraway seed. I’ve never tried it, but have heard it’s good. Keep adding layers of cabbage and salt until all the veggies are in the container.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

Food processor with some red cabbage below.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

D.) I put all the shredded future kraut into a larger container. You should let the mixture set for about an hour (some recommend 24 hours – but who’s counting) to let the salt begin drawing the moisture out of the veggies. I didn’t wait since I used stainless steel this time. I just started squeezing the juice out. You’ll notice the brine starting to pool at the bottom of your container. Keep squeezing. Some folks call it messaging. I brutalized my kraut for about 20-30 minutes.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

E.) Once there’s a fair amount of brine in the bottom of your container, start filling the quart jars. I try to leave about an inch of head space. As you fill the jar, you’ll want to use a utensil to pack the kraut layer by layer. I used a big wooden spoon. The micro lovelies like it packed tight to better do their thing. Fermentation.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

F.) Once filled, make sure the veggies are covered completely with brine. I’ve seen people use a piece of cabbage to cover the kraut with a weight of some kind. I didn’t use that method. I just made sure I had enough brine to cover. Use any left in the big container to pour over the jar contents. If you don’t have enough brine, use distilled water and a little sea salt mix until dissolved. Then pour enough to cover. Cap the jars with lids and screw the rings down loosely. Check the jars every day or so to make sure the brine is still covering the kraut. You may have to press the kraut down on each check up to ensure it stays submerged.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

G.) Label the lid with the date of processing. Put it away and let nature do the rest. I let this batch sit for about a week. I just opened a jar and enjoyed its goodness.

I just found 4 crocks at a yard sale this morning. I paid seven bucks for the whole lot. I plan on using the largest on my next batch of sauerkraut.

Doing the stuff,

Todd

This article was written by Survival Sherpa and can be viewed at the link below

Go visit Todd at his place and learn more about preparedness!

This article can also be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply

Simply Pumpkin Pie

Welcome to your Simply Pumpkin Pie Tutorial AND Recipe!  Yes, Simply Living Simply is all about Semi-Homemade…but today were making Pumpkin Pie from Scratch…yes, SCRATCH!  So a quick overview.  We need pumpkins, sugar/baking pumpkins are best.  Two will do you.  A blender, some time, your favorite pie crust recipe (check back this week when I will be sharing Stacy Harris’s Pie Recipe!), and ingredients for your pie.

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s get bakin!!

 

Kat’s in the kitchen!

Pumpkin Puree Tutorial

1.  Choose 2 pumpkins, preferably sugar/baking pumpkins.

2.  Wash or wipe off the outsides. Place on foil lined cookie sheet.

Time to bake the pumpkins

3.  Preheat oven to 350 and bake in the middle for 20-1 Hr.  Time depends on how big your pumpkins are and how many you are baking.  Don’t cut the tops off or poke holes.  Leave those pumpkins ALONE…NO TOUCHIE!

4. When a knife inserted easily comes out clean … your done, they are done!

5.  Take out carefully, they are hot and heavy.  NOW cut the tops off carefully…STEAM will escape and its HOT!!

6.  Allow to cool…this takes about 30 minutes.

7.  Cut in half to help cool.  Then divide into sections.

Cut in half to cool

8.  Seeds scoop out easily with your knife or a spoon.

9.  Carve off the skin (like when sectioning cantaloupe)

Carve out the flesh and cut into chunks for storage or puree

10. Cube into chunks.

11.  You could now put into plastic freezer bags for later use OR puree

12.  To Puree: fill blender halfway full, add a little water, turn blender on, add more water if needed for consistency.  Blend till smooth.

 

Pumpkin and a little water, that’s it folks

13.  Store in freezer bags in 2 C. increments, easy for recipe use!

Simply Pumpkin Pie

Let’s get your pie going now…the pictures you will see are 1 pumpkin pie.  There are only 2 of us here…and 2 pies is just overkill and dangerous!

1.  Preheat your oven to your desired temperature…we are going for 425

2.  Find your pie plates and get your most favorite pie crust in there all beautiful like!!

 

This is my favorite whole wheat crust…Stacy Harris original!

3. Now we add all our ingredients to our bowl.  You know the drill, Pumpkin puree, eggs, sugar, spices, and evaporated milk.

4. Mix

Mix Everything together

5. Pour…isn’t it pretty?!

All ready for the oven

6. Bake!

Waiting is so hard…smellin good!

7.  EAT…no wait, it’s hot…..but your so tempted, right??!!!

Out of the oven, cooled and ready to EAT!
Simply Pumpkin Pie Recipe

Rating: 5

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Please note, the pictures in the tutorial are only 1 pie, I halved the recipe up above. Watch your crust, if they start to brown too much, put foil sleeves over them.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 large eggs
  • 16 oz. Pumpkin Puree, Homemade
  • 1 can Evaporated Milk
  • 1 large DEEP dish pie shell or 2 Shallow pie shells

Instructions

  1. MIX sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk.
  2. POUR into pie shell or shells
  3. BAKE in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean.
  4. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours.
  5. Serve immediately or refrigerate.
  6. Top with whipped cream before serving.

 

This fantastic article can also be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply.  Like them on Facebook while you are there!

Herbal Remedies: Sore Throat & Coughs

A cough, sore throat or even laryngitis….simply indications that your sore throat involves your vocal cords….are really more Symptoms than actual Illnesses.  What causes these symptoms?

 

 

 

Infection

Simple irritation

Result of a Cold or Flu

Strep Throat

Viral Laryngitis

 

Coughing is Beneficial

Coughing can actually be beneficial…it’s the body’s way of clearing the airways so that you can breathe.  It also helps rid the body of mucus, which you DO want to get OUT of the body!

But after awhile, all that coughing starts to irritate the throat.  This is where herbs can come to the rescue!  Herbal cough drops or herbal cough syrup help reduce the irritation that makes you cough and also diminishes the pain.

Using a cough drop or syrup bring the herbs more into direct contact with your throat…coating and soothing your throat much better than tinctures or tea will.

 

Helpful Herbs

Anise

Eucalyptus

Fennel

Peppermint

Thyme

Marshmallow

Licorice

Slippery Elm

Plantain

All of these herbs have been used to craft remedies for aiding sore throats and coughing.

Anise, eucalyptus, fennel, peppermint and thyme are used quite a lot in cough medications; they are quite tasty and they work by shutting down the brain’s coughing center.

Marshmallow, licorice and slippery elm are great sore throat soothers.  Marshmallow was suggested as a cough remedy i fourth century B.C. by the Greek physician Theophrastus.  Native Americans have long used the bark of the Slippery Elm tree to stop coughs.  Native Americans made a tea of Slippery Elm, created a gargle and even chewed on small pieces of the bark when they had sore throats.

Plantain is another good remedy and quite popular in Germany, China and Russia.  Research in these countries showed that this herb stops coughing, wheezing and chest pain from bronchitis.

 

Helpful Essential Oils

Eucalyptus

Lavender

Cinnamon

Black Pepper

Lemon

Thyme

Marjoram

Rosemary

Basil

Peppermint

 

Natural Anti-biotics

Numerous scientific studies support the claim that garlic is a “natural antibiotic”.  Researchers have found it to be particularly good at fighting strep infections.  Other herbs that are good fighters are:

Berberine

Goldenseal

Barberry

Oregon Grape Root

 

Lavender

 

Laryngitis EO Steam Remedy

3 C. Water

1/4 tsp  Lavender & Eucalyptus

Bring water to a simmer, turn off and remove from heat.

Add essential oils.  Set pot where you can sit down next to it, place your face over the pot, drape head with towel to form mini-sauna. Breathe in the steam.  Repeat 3 rounds at least 3X a day.

 

Sage

 

Sage Gargle

1 C Boiling Water

2 tsp Sage Leaves

Salt

Pour boiling water over sage leaves, cover and steep 20 minutes.

Strain, add salt and gargle as needed.

Store in refrigerator, will keep for several days.

Substitutions: Marjoram, Thyme, Hyssop.

 

Plantain

 

Honey Cough Syrup

1 TBSP EACH Licorice root, Marshmallow root, Plantain leaf

1 tsp Thyme leaf

1 pint water

4 TBSP Honey (Raw, organic)

4 oz Glycerin

1/8 tsp Anise Essential Oil

Prepare a triple-strength tea by simmering herbs in water for 10 minutes, then steeping in the water for 20 minutes.

Strain tea, stir in honey and glycerin while warm.  Add essential Oil.

Take 1 TBSP as needed (Adults) 1/2 TBSP (Children)

**DO NOT give to infants**

Stored in a cool place will keep for 2 weeks, in the refrigerator will keep for several months!

This article can also be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply.  Like them on Facebook while you are there!