Tag Archives: Health

A Beginner’s Guide To Using Aromatherapy With Children

Essential oils are pure aromatic plant essences – they are distilled from flowers, fruit, leaves, resins, roots, seeds, and wood. The are used for their healing properties the world over.  In the United States, we have free access to essential oils – but with this comes some important cautions: Only some of the essential oils available are suitable for children; others are not suitable for children and some are even dangerous to children (children with epilepsy should not come in contact with stimulating essential oils).

When used correctly, essential oils can be of great benefit, and will not conflict with your child’s health or any medically prescribed drugs. Always research the oil of choice thoroughly before using with your infant or child – ask advice from a qualified practitioner, or see the references at the end of this article.

That said, essential oils can be a wonderful way of supporting your child’s health, happiness and well-being. Essential oils can be very therapeutic and nurturing to both your child and you, the caregiver. Essential oils are used externally (on the outside of the body) in your child’s bath, body lotions, oils, creams, gels, compresses, foot baths, or in a oil warmer.

The effects of aromatherapy will generally fall into one of three main categories:

1) Assisting in healing from minor illnesses and accidents

2) Supporting your child’s overall sense of well-being

3) Assisting your child in getting quality rest

When using essential oils with your child, it is imperative that you find a reputable supplier of therapeutic-grade essential oils, using organic or wild-crafted varieties when possible.Synthetic copies of oils commonly used in perfumery are not appropriate, and may even be harmful to your child’s health. To maintain efficacy, essential oils should be kept in dark amber or cobalt glass containers, in a dark and cool location, away from the child’s access. Wooden storage boxes from craft or ‘Pier One’ type stores can make a nice container for the bottles.

Methods of Using Essential Oils

There are two methods of using essential oils with your child:

INHALATION: through a diffuser, nebulizer, or adding to a humidifier reservoir

TOPICAL APPLICATION: diluting the essential oil in a carrier oil and applying topically. Adding essential oils to a bath combines the two methods, though we will cover it under topical application.

For topical application, essential oils are diluted in varying strengths depending on the use and age of your child. The concentration can vary from one drop of essential oil per tablespoon of carrier oil, to a couple of drops per teaspoon of carrier added to a drawn bath, to an equal ratio of carrier and essential oil applied directly to your child’s feet (as in the case of gentle Lavender). In other words, there is a huge variation in dilution levels depending on the circumstances. Mamas, do your research and then trust your instinct. Only you and your child baby know exactly what is right for your situation.

General dilution rate guidelines of essential oils in one ounce of carrier oil:

Age of Child and amount of Essential Oil per One Ounce Carrier Oil for Topical/Massage Application:

Newborn (Consult primary care physician before use)       1-3 drops essential oil / ounce

2-6 months                                                                                 1-3 drops essential oil / ounce
6-12 months                                                                               1-4 drops essential oil / ounce
1-4 years (unless very small)                                                  5-8 drops essential oil / ounce
6-7 years                                                                                     5-10 drops essential oil / ounce
9-12 years                                                                                   5-12 drops essential oil / ounce
12 years to young adult                                                             10-15 drops essential oil / ounce

DO NOT USE AN ESSENTIAL OIL NEAT (undiluted ) on children’s skin, unless indicated to do so for a specific condition. If your child has very sensitive skin, it is important to test a small area before using a new single oil or blend. Keep essential oils away form the eyes. When using citrus oils – orange, bergamot, lemon, tangerine, mandarin, and lime – do not use where the skin will be exposed to sunlight for the next 12 hours. These oils are considered ‘phototoxic’, and can react from the sun’s rays. They may be used in a bath, however, where they will be washed off the skin when the bath is done.

Essential oils are not to be taken orally (by mouth). When your child is taking medications, reduce the amount of essential oil by half the amount recommended for their age group.

Carrier oils for children

Sweet Almond oil is generally regarded as the safest and best overall carrier oil for use with babies and children. Apricot kernel oil is also considered extremely safe with children over 6. Jojoba oil can be added at about 10% concentration for any blend – it has a soothing effect on the skin and is good for hair.

Topical Application – Nurturing Touch Massage Recipes

There is nothing better for any child than the loving, nurturing touch of a parent. A gentle hug, a smile, a kiss on the cheek all reassure the child and help the parent and child to bond. These everyday forms of connection are instinctual and children thrive from it.

Research shows that massage can help children’s growth both physically and emotionally. In hospitals, studies done with premature baby’s show that touch is an essential aspect of the children’s ability to thrive.

Using aromatherapy, massage can be therapeutic to both the child and the parent. Using a light, conscientious touch you can massage your child’s feet, arms, hands, back, abdomen, and even legs. The massage should always be done with loving intention and the work is done in the direction that the blood flows-from ankles to leg; from wrist to shoulder, etc.

Here are a few suggested blends for this wonderful method – each is in one (1) ounce of Sweet Almond oil:

Restful Sleep – 4 drops lavender, 2 drops Roman Chamomile

Happy Child – 3 drops Rose, 1 drop Neroli

Calm and Relaxed – 3 drops Petitgrain, 3 drops Neroli

Emotional Nurturing – 1 drop Rose, 1 drop Vanilla, 2 drops Lavender

For a Baby oil blend, to be used as a moisturizer OR massage oil (note: the frequent washing of a baby’s skin actually makes it difficult for them to retain vitamin C; application of a quality skin oil will help them keep adequate supplies of this important nutrient).

1 ounce of organic sweet almond oil or hazelnut oil
1 drop of pure Lavender essential oil
1 drop of Vanilla essential oil

OR

1 ounce of organic sweet almond oil
2 drops of pure Lavender essential oil
1 drop of pure Chamomile (German) essential oil

The above blends can also be added to the bath. One teaspoon with the following amount of essential oils added can be added AFTER the bath is filled, per the age of the child: 3-5 years, 2 drops; 6-8 years, 3 drops; 8-11 years, 5 drops. Perhaps the easiest way to do this would be to make a full strength blend (without carrier oil) of your choice, then dilute as needed for the application.

Inhalation of essential oils

For inhalation, one can apply one or two drops to a handkerchief and inhale, or add oils to a water misting bottle or humidifier.

Calming essential oils that may be used are Lavender (recommended for sleep – one to four drops can be placed under the pillow), Mandarin, Roman Chamomile, Ho Wood (an ecologically friendly replacement for Rosewood), Tangerine, Petitgrain, Vanilla, and Neroli. Use these oils singly, create your own blend, or use one of the body oil blends above without the carrier oil. A few drops per quart of water in a mister sprayed throughout a room or added humidifier resevoir will do.

For an anti-anxiety blend: Try 5 drops bergamot, 1 drop lavender and 3 drops geranium – dilute to 10 drops per ½ pint of water for a room spray or use in a humidifier, or dilute to the appropriate level for your child’s age if using topically. For alertness, try lemon, bergamot, grapefruit or pine, either singly or in a blend that pleases your senses (usually the best way to blend is to trust your nose!)

Essential oils can also be used in a candle lamp or warmer – with the oil gently evaporated from the surface of a small bowl of water by the heat of a candle. An electric nebulizing diffuser is generally not recommended for use with children, as the concentration of oils in the air can be too high.

Last but not least, essential oils are wonderful antiseptics.

Cuts and scrapes are simply a way of life for the little ones! A great blend for minor wounds is a 1:1 mix of Lavender and Tea Tree oil. The lavender is soothing, anti-inflammatory, and has regenerative ‘ketones’, while the tea tree is a strong antiseptic used for many generations by native Australians. Use this blend in the water used for cleaning wounds, and apply a few drops to the gauze of a bandage – do not apply directly to the skin as it will be unnecessarily irritating. On the bandage, however, it will be soothing and accelerate the healing process.

 

Lavender…one of the BEST and safest essential oils for a variety of uses

 

So this is a very brief overview of using essential oils with children. There are many, many diverse applications for essential oils for almost every conceivable minor ailment seen in childhood. The key is knowledge – finding a good practitioner, or reputable resource for your needs. For further reading, books by Valerie Ann Woorwood are excellent: Aromatherapy for the Healthy Child: More Than 300 Natural, Nontoxic, and Fragrant Essential Oil Blends A Beginners Guide To Using Aromatherapy With Children AND The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy: Over 600 Natural, Non-Toxic and Fragrant Recipes to Create Health – Beauty – a Safe Home Environment A Beginners Guide To Using Aromatherapy With Children

The essential oils mentioned within this article are recognized as safe for most individuals – if you or your child are recognized as having a specific illness, and/or are under a doctor’s regular care, please consult an appropriate practitioner before proceeding.

That said, Aromatherapy can be a very fun and rewarding endeavor for both you and your child. Essential oils have benefited the lives of many the world over, and have a little bit of plant magic available to everyone.

 

This article was written by Kat Yorba and can be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply

Get Your Gut In Shape: Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

I always wipe down the shopping cart handle with the handy sanitizing wipes at the grocery store. I’m doing my part in the war on germs being waged in our society. Anti-bacterial soap, anti-bacterial hand sanitizer are only the tip of our modern microorganism warhead. Pasteurized and irradiated food is a relatively new practice. Sterile is good, right?

Fermented foods have sustained humans for thousands of years. When it comes to our gut flora, exposure to bacteria is a good thing. Fermented foods offer the sterile gut a healthy dose of probiotics to help balance our intestinal flora. In a prolonged emergency or TEOTWAWKI event, the skill of fermentation will become very useful – even life saving. When the lights go out, a lot of sub 40 degree food will go to waste.

My sauerkraut will last for years if it had to. Around my house, it doesn’t stand a chance lasting a year.

Here’s my step-by-step process Down and Dirty Sauerkraut.

A.) Gather your ingredients. In this batch, I used one head of white cabbage, one head of red, and about 9 carrots, and some sea salt. You’ll need 2 or 3 wide mouth quart jars with lids. Always use glass to store the kraut to prevent acidic reactions with metal material. I used stainless steel pans to mix the kraut, but only leave it in long enough to mix it. You should really use non-reactive containers in the whole process.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

B.) Shred the cabbage or other vegetables you want to add to your kraut. I use a food processor for a down and dirty (quick) method. Some folks like to slice it with a knife to get the desired length on the kraut. If you’re fortunate, you own a cabbage shredder.

C.) Spread a layer (about an inch or so) into big container. Sprinkle some sea salt over the layer. How much? I don’t know. I don’t make stuff with exact recipes. You may also like to add a tablespoon of caraway seed. I’ve never tried it, but have heard it’s good. Keep adding layers of cabbage and salt until all the veggies are in the container.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

Food processor with some red cabbage below.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

D.) I put all the shredded future kraut into a larger container. You should let the mixture set for about an hour (some recommend 24 hours – but who’s counting) to let the salt begin drawing the moisture out of the veggies. I didn’t wait since I used stainless steel this time. I just started squeezing the juice out. You’ll notice the brine starting to pool at the bottom of your container. Keep squeezing. Some folks call it messaging. I brutalized my kraut for about 20-30 minutes.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

E.) Once there’s a fair amount of brine in the bottom of your container, start filling the quart jars. I try to leave about an inch of head space. As you fill the jar, you’ll want to use a utensil to pack the kraut layer by layer. I used a big wooden spoon. The micro lovelies like it packed tight to better do their thing. Fermentation.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

F.) Once filled, make sure the veggies are covered completely with brine. I’ve seen people use a piece of cabbage to cover the kraut with a weight of some kind. I didn’t use that method. I just made sure I had enough brine to cover. Use any left in the big container to pour over the jar contents. If you don’t have enough brine, use distilled water and a little sea salt mix until dissolved. Then pour enough to cover. Cap the jars with lids and screw the rings down loosely. Check the jars every day or so to make sure the brine is still covering the kraut. You may have to press the kraut down on each check up to ensure it stays submerged.

 Get Your Gut in Shape with Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

G.) Label the lid with the date of processing. Put it away and let nature do the rest. I let this batch sit for about a week. I just opened a jar and enjoyed its goodness.

I just found 4 crocks at a yard sale this morning. I paid seven bucks for the whole lot. I plan on using the largest on my next batch of sauerkraut.

Doing the stuff,

Todd

This article was written by Survival Sherpa and can be viewed at the link below

Go visit Todd at his place and learn more about preparedness!

This article can also be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply

Simply Pumpkin Pie

Welcome to your Simply Pumpkin Pie Tutorial AND Recipe!  Yes, Simply Living Simply is all about Semi-Homemade…but today were making Pumpkin Pie from Scratch…yes, SCRATCH!  So a quick overview.  We need pumpkins, sugar/baking pumpkins are best.  Two will do you.  A blender, some time, your favorite pie crust recipe (check back this week when I will be sharing Stacy Harris’s Pie Recipe!), and ingredients for your pie.

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s get bakin!!

 

Kat’s in the kitchen!

Pumpkin Puree Tutorial

1.  Choose 2 pumpkins, preferably sugar/baking pumpkins.

2.  Wash or wipe off the outsides. Place on foil lined cookie sheet.

Time to bake the pumpkins

3.  Preheat oven to 350 and bake in the middle for 20-1 Hr.  Time depends on how big your pumpkins are and how many you are baking.  Don’t cut the tops off or poke holes.  Leave those pumpkins ALONE…NO TOUCHIE!

4. When a knife inserted easily comes out clean … your done, they are done!

5.  Take out carefully, they are hot and heavy.  NOW cut the tops off carefully…STEAM will escape and its HOT!!

6.  Allow to cool…this takes about 30 minutes.

7.  Cut in half to help cool.  Then divide into sections.

Cut in half to cool

8.  Seeds scoop out easily with your knife or a spoon.

9.  Carve off the skin (like when sectioning cantaloupe)

Carve out the flesh and cut into chunks for storage or puree

10. Cube into chunks.

11.  You could now put into plastic freezer bags for later use OR puree

12.  To Puree: fill blender halfway full, add a little water, turn blender on, add more water if needed for consistency.  Blend till smooth.

 

Pumpkin and a little water, that’s it folks

13.  Store in freezer bags in 2 C. increments, easy for recipe use!

Simply Pumpkin Pie

Let’s get your pie going now…the pictures you will see are 1 pumpkin pie.  There are only 2 of us here…and 2 pies is just overkill and dangerous!

1.  Preheat your oven to your desired temperature…we are going for 425

2.  Find your pie plates and get your most favorite pie crust in there all beautiful like!!

 

This is my favorite whole wheat crust…Stacy Harris original!

3. Now we add all our ingredients to our bowl.  You know the drill, Pumpkin puree, eggs, sugar, spices, and evaporated milk.

4. Mix

Mix Everything together

5. Pour…isn’t it pretty?!

All ready for the oven

6. Bake!

Waiting is so hard…smellin good!

7.  EAT…no wait, it’s hot…..but your so tempted, right??!!!

Out of the oven, cooled and ready to EAT!
Simply Pumpkin Pie Recipe

Rating: 5

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Please note, the pictures in the tutorial are only 1 pie, I halved the recipe up above. Watch your crust, if they start to brown too much, put foil sleeves over them.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 large eggs
  • 16 oz. Pumpkin Puree, Homemade
  • 1 can Evaporated Milk
  • 1 large DEEP dish pie shell or 2 Shallow pie shells

Instructions

  1. MIX sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk.
  2. POUR into pie shell or shells
  3. BAKE in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean.
  4. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours.
  5. Serve immediately or refrigerate.
  6. Top with whipped cream before serving.

 

This fantastic article can also be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply.  Like them on Facebook while you are there!

Herbal Remedies: Sore Throat & Coughs

A cough, sore throat or even laryngitis….simply indications that your sore throat involves your vocal cords….are really more Symptoms than actual Illnesses.  What causes these symptoms?

 

 

 

Infection

Simple irritation

Result of a Cold or Flu

Strep Throat

Viral Laryngitis

 

Coughing is Beneficial

Coughing can actually be beneficial…it’s the body’s way of clearing the airways so that you can breathe.  It also helps rid the body of mucus, which you DO want to get OUT of the body!

But after awhile, all that coughing starts to irritate the throat.  This is where herbs can come to the rescue!  Herbal cough drops or herbal cough syrup help reduce the irritation that makes you cough and also diminishes the pain.

Using a cough drop or syrup bring the herbs more into direct contact with your throat…coating and soothing your throat much better than tinctures or tea will.

 

Helpful Herbs

Anise

Eucalyptus

Fennel

Peppermint

Thyme

Marshmallow

Licorice

Slippery Elm

Plantain

All of these herbs have been used to craft remedies for aiding sore throats and coughing.

Anise, eucalyptus, fennel, peppermint and thyme are used quite a lot in cough medications; they are quite tasty and they work by shutting down the brain’s coughing center.

Marshmallow, licorice and slippery elm are great sore throat soothers.  Marshmallow was suggested as a cough remedy i fourth century B.C. by the Greek physician Theophrastus.  Native Americans have long used the bark of the Slippery Elm tree to stop coughs.  Native Americans made a tea of Slippery Elm, created a gargle and even chewed on small pieces of the bark when they had sore throats.

Plantain is another good remedy and quite popular in Germany, China and Russia.  Research in these countries showed that this herb stops coughing, wheezing and chest pain from bronchitis.

 

Helpful Essential Oils

Eucalyptus

Lavender

Cinnamon

Black Pepper

Lemon

Thyme

Marjoram

Rosemary

Basil

Peppermint

 

Natural Anti-biotics

Numerous scientific studies support the claim that garlic is a “natural antibiotic”.  Researchers have found it to be particularly good at fighting strep infections.  Other herbs that are good fighters are:

Berberine

Goldenseal

Barberry

Oregon Grape Root

 

Lavender

 

Laryngitis EO Steam Remedy

3 C. Water

1/4 tsp  Lavender & Eucalyptus

Bring water to a simmer, turn off and remove from heat.

Add essential oils.  Set pot where you can sit down next to it, place your face over the pot, drape head with towel to form mini-sauna. Breathe in the steam.  Repeat 3 rounds at least 3X a day.

 

Sage

 

Sage Gargle

1 C Boiling Water

2 tsp Sage Leaves

Salt

Pour boiling water over sage leaves, cover and steep 20 minutes.

Strain, add salt and gargle as needed.

Store in refrigerator, will keep for several days.

Substitutions: Marjoram, Thyme, Hyssop.

 

Plantain

 

Honey Cough Syrup

1 TBSP EACH Licorice root, Marshmallow root, Plantain leaf

1 tsp Thyme leaf

1 pint water

4 TBSP Honey (Raw, organic)

4 oz Glycerin

1/8 tsp Anise Essential Oil

Prepare a triple-strength tea by simmering herbs in water for 10 minutes, then steeping in the water for 20 minutes.

Strain tea, stir in honey and glycerin while warm.  Add essential Oil.

Take 1 TBSP as needed (Adults) 1/2 TBSP (Children)

**DO NOT give to infants**

Stored in a cool place will keep for 2 weeks, in the refrigerator will keep for several months!

This article can also be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply.  Like them on Facebook while you are there!

 

Autumn Squash

There is a chill in the wind, leaves falling from the trees and the temps dip into the low 50′s at night here.  We grab sweaters and jackets when we leave the house and it’s dark when we get home.  It’s Fall…with Winter fast on her heels.

Thankfully God has brightened our chilly Fall days and Winter nights with glorious beautiful squash….Acorn and Kabocha we will spotlight today, but there are many others.  Speghetti, Butternut, Delicata, Hubbard, Turbin and yes….Pumpkin!, just to name a few.

 

Acorn Squash

Acorn

Until the recent rise in popularity of butternut squash, acorn squash were the most commonly available squash in the U.S. They are a great all-around squash, with moist, sweet, tender flesh. They are good for roasting, baking, steaming, mashing, and sauteeing. Smaller ones are perfect for stuffing and make an excellent vegetarian main course for special occasions like Thanksgiving.

Acorn squash are round, with even groves around the entire squash. They are mostly dark green, with occasional splotches of orange and yellow. The flesh is a slightly yellowish pumpkin orange. They tend to weight between 12 oz. and 2 pounds.

 

Kabocha Squash

Kabocha

Kabocha squash have a remarkably sweet and tender flesh with a slightly nutty flavor. The peel is really more of a rind and is difficult to cut. The dense, smooth, sweet flesh is so tasty it needs very little fuss in preparation. Roasting it or slicing and baking it with a bit of butter or oil and salt are all this delicious squash needs. The dense flesh also holds its shaped with cooked, even in liquids, which makes it perfect for using as chunks in soups or steamed dishes. It pairs well with ginger and sesame as well.

Kabocha squash are large, round, and squat. They are dark green and mottled, often with bumpy skin and make lovely table decoration until they’re cooked.

Recipes

We couldn’t end this post without some recipes for the season and to celebrate the wonderful bounty from God!

Baked Acorn Squash

Ingredients

  • 2 Acorn Squash, halved lengthwise, seeded and bottoms trimmed to lie flat
  • 1/4 C. Heavy Cream
  • 8 Springs of Thyme (you may use dried to sprinkle)
  • 1/2 C. Grated Parmesan Cheese

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. Place squash halves cut side up on a baking sheet and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Divide cream and thyme among the halves.
  4. Bake until squash is tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife, 35-40 minutes.
  5. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and bake until cheese is melted.

 

Autumn Pork Chops – Crock Pot Alert!

Ingredients

  • 6 Thick pork chops
  • 2 Medium acorn squash
  • 3/4 teaspoon Salt
  • 2 tablespoons Margarine, melted
  • 3/4 cup Brown sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon Kitchen Bouquet or brownn sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Orange juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon Orange peel, grated

Instructions

  1. Trim excess fat from pork chops.
  2. Cut each squash into 4 or 5 crosswise slices; remove seeds.
  3. Arrange 3 chops on bottom of Crock pot.
  4. Place all squash slices on top; then another layer of three remaining chops.
  5. Combine salt, butter, sugar, bouquet sauce, orange juice and orange peel.
  6. Spoon over chops.
  7. Cover and cook on low 6−8 hours or until done.
  8. Serve one or two slices of squash with each pork chop.

 

Autumn Chicken, Rice & Kabocha…Oh My!

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp oil, divided
  • 6 skin-on chicken thighs
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 Med. white onion, diced
  • 1/2 Lrg. Kabocha Squash, seeded and cut into large chunks (4 Cups)
  • 2 Cloves Garlic, minced
  • 6 Sprigs Oregano (or can use dried)
  • 1 1/2 C. Whole Wheat & Wild Rice
  • 1/4 C. Chardonnay wine
  • 3 1/2 C. Chicken Broth

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. In large heavy pot with tight fitting lid, heat 1 Tbsp oil over high heat.
  3. Season chicken with salt and pepper.
  4. Working in batches, cook chicken skin side down till golden brown 6-8 minutes. Flip, cook 1 minute more.
  5. Transfer to plate, discard fat, wipe pot clean.
  6. Reduce heat to medium, add remaining oil to pot.
  7. Add onion and squash and cook till onion is translucent – 8 minutes or so.
  8. Add garlic and oregano and cook till fragrant.
  9. Add rice and cook, stirring until opaque.
  10. Add wine and cook, stirring, till completely evaporated.
  11. Return chicken to pot, skin side up, add broth, sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  12. Bring to a boil, cover, transfer to oven and cook till liquid is absorbed and rice is tender.
  13. Approx 25 minutes. Let sit, covered for 10 minutes.

 

This article can also be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply