Tag Archives: Oregon

Herbal Remedies: Sore Throat & Coughs

A cough, sore throat or even laryngitis….simply indications that your sore throat involves your vocal cords….are really more Symptoms than actual Illnesses.  What causes these symptoms?

 

 

 

Infection

Simple irritation

Result of a Cold or Flu

Strep Throat

Viral Laryngitis

 

Coughing is Beneficial

Coughing can actually be beneficial…it’s the body’s way of clearing the airways so that you can breathe.  It also helps rid the body of mucus, which you DO want to get OUT of the body!

But after awhile, all that coughing starts to irritate the throat.  This is where herbs can come to the rescue!  Herbal cough drops or herbal cough syrup help reduce the irritation that makes you cough and also diminishes the pain.

Using a cough drop or syrup bring the herbs more into direct contact with your throat…coating and soothing your throat much better than tinctures or tea will.

 

Helpful Herbs

Anise

Eucalyptus

Fennel

Peppermint

Thyme

Marshmallow

Licorice

Slippery Elm

Plantain

All of these herbs have been used to craft remedies for aiding sore throats and coughing.

Anise, eucalyptus, fennel, peppermint and thyme are used quite a lot in cough medications; they are quite tasty and they work by shutting down the brain’s coughing center.

Marshmallow, licorice and slippery elm are great sore throat soothers.  Marshmallow was suggested as a cough remedy i fourth century B.C. by the Greek physician Theophrastus.  Native Americans have long used the bark of the Slippery Elm tree to stop coughs.  Native Americans made a tea of Slippery Elm, created a gargle and even chewed on small pieces of the bark when they had sore throats.

Plantain is another good remedy and quite popular in Germany, China and Russia.  Research in these countries showed that this herb stops coughing, wheezing and chest pain from bronchitis.

 

Helpful Essential Oils

Eucalyptus

Lavender

Cinnamon

Black Pepper

Lemon

Thyme

Marjoram

Rosemary

Basil

Peppermint

 

Natural Anti-biotics

Numerous scientific studies support the claim that garlic is a “natural antibiotic”.  Researchers have found it to be particularly good at fighting strep infections.  Other herbs that are good fighters are:

Berberine

Goldenseal

Barberry

Oregon Grape Root

 

Lavender

 

Laryngitis EO Steam Remedy

3 C. Water

1/4 tsp  Lavender & Eucalyptus

Bring water to a simmer, turn off and remove from heat.

Add essential oils.  Set pot where you can sit down next to it, place your face over the pot, drape head with towel to form mini-sauna. Breathe in the steam.  Repeat 3 rounds at least 3X a day.

 

Sage

 

Sage Gargle

1 C Boiling Water

2 tsp Sage Leaves

Salt

Pour boiling water over sage leaves, cover and steep 20 minutes.

Strain, add salt and gargle as needed.

Store in refrigerator, will keep for several days.

Substitutions: Marjoram, Thyme, Hyssop.

 

Plantain

 

Honey Cough Syrup

1 TBSP EACH Licorice root, Marshmallow root, Plantain leaf

1 tsp Thyme leaf

1 pint water

4 TBSP Honey (Raw, organic)

4 oz Glycerin

1/8 tsp Anise Essential Oil

Prepare a triple-strength tea by simmering herbs in water for 10 minutes, then steeping in the water for 20 minutes.

Strain tea, stir in honey and glycerin while warm.  Add essential Oil.

Take 1 TBSP as needed (Adults) 1/2 TBSP (Children)

**DO NOT give to infants**

Stored in a cool place will keep for 2 weeks, in the refrigerator will keep for several months!

This article can also be viewed at Simply-Living-Simply.  Like them on Facebook while you are there!

 

Herbal Medicine Kit – Cuts & Scrapes Part 2

Welcome Back…

…to another posting of the Herbal Medicine Kit. We will be discussing the herbs Oregon Graperoot, Goldenseal and Lemon essential oil. We will be making Tincture of Goldenseal and Lemon & Tea Tree Antiseptic Spray.

Let’s get to it…

Cuts & Scrapes Part 2

Scraped Elbow!

Regardless of how careful you might be, the human body is subject to all kinds of injuries, not the least of which are cuts and scrapes. Throughout history, people have used herbal remedies to treat minor skin disturbances. The ancient Romans made strange compresses using spider webs to treat their cuts and scrapes. Native Americans used sphagnum moss in a similar fashion. Don’t ignore basic first aid when it comes to treating a cut or scrape, apply pressure to stop the bleeding, and then clean the wound. Here is where herbs come in; they can effectively clean and soothe many common, everyday cuts and scrapes.

Check with your doctor if you have concerns about using herbal remedies.

Sprays, which can be potent antiseptics are good for raw wounds or any injuries that you want to avoid touching.

Lemon & Tea Tree Antiseptic Spray

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Lemon & Tea Tree Antiseptic Spray

Oregon Grape Root

Oregon Grape

Oregon-Grape, the state flower of Oregon, derives its name from its use as a medicine and food along the Oregon Trail, and that popularity as a food and medicine nearly led to its extinction in the late nineteenth century. The plant was also included in the traditional diets and medicines of the Pacific Northwest aboriginal peoples. Both the leaves and root bark of this evergreen perennial are used medicinally, and the root, containing the powerful alkaloid, berberine, was officially included in the United States Pharmacopoeia from 1905 to 1916.

Oregon- Grape leaves greatly resemble holly leaves, and the plant bears beautiful yellow flowers and small, tart, purplish-black fruits that resemble grape clusters. Oregon-Grape was included in many culinary preparations, including a jelly that is rich in vitamin C, and the root was also used as a greenish-yellow dye (the berries were a source of purple dye). Blackfoot Indians called it Ot-to-gue and used it to check rectal hemorrhage, dysentery and stomach troubles. The Kwakiutls made a bark tea to offset an excess of bile, and Oregon-Grape was also found to be beneficial for open boils, kidney troubles and as a topical antiseptic for wounds. In Europe today, Oregon-Grape is used topically to treat psoriasis and dry skin rashes. Some of the principal constituents in Oregon-Grape include alkaloids (especially berberine, berbamine, isocorydin and oxyacanthine), tannins and vitamin C.

***Berberine-containing plants (Barberry, Oregon-Grape, Goldenseal, etc.) should not be used by pregnant or nursing women. Those who suffer from hyperthyroid conditions should not take Oregon Grape Root Herbal Supplement, and diabetics should use Oregon-Grape Root only under the supervision of a physician. There is some evidence that berberine may interfere with the efficacy of tetracycline medications. High doses (many times the recommended amount) may cause vomiting, lowered blood pressure and lowered heart rate, lethargy, nosebleed, skin, eye and kidney irritation. Do not take Oregon-Grape Root if you have chronic diarrhea, a duodenal ulcer or excessive stomach acid, as it could make these conditions worse. Oregon- Grape root is not recommended for prolonged use.

Oregon Grape Root Tincture Printable

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Oregon Grape Root Tincture

 

Goldenseal

Goldenseal

Goldenseal is a hardy, herbaceous, North American woodland perennial that grows under two feet in height with a thick, yellow root and a single, erect stem producing leaves and a flower. The flowers are small, white; and a patch of Hydrastis will not remain in blossom longer than a week or ten days. From the flower, a single, red, inedible fruit emerges, but it is the roots, dug from three-year-old plants, that are used in herbal medicine. Its botanical genus, Hydrastis, is said to be derived from two Greek words signifying “water” and “to accomplish,” probably attributed because of its active effect on the body’s mucous membranes secretions.

In 1798, Benjamin Smith Barton observed that the Cherokees used it as a folk cancer remedy, which is also one of the earliest observations of the occurrence and treatment of cancer among American Indian groups. Few wildflowers were as important to the American Indians as the versatile Goldenseal. The roots supplied the Cherokee and Iroquois with a brilliant yellow dye for their weapons and clothing, a paint for their faces (giving the plant one of its common names, Yellow Indian Paint) and medicinal remedies for indigestion, inflamed eyes, mouth ulcers, cancer, tuberculosis and edema.

It may not have been effective for all those ailments, but its use as an antiseptic and in stopping bleeding was well noted. Pioneers quickly adopted Goldenseal, and it became a mainstay of pioneer medicine, frequently sold as an ingredient in patent medicines in traveling medicine shows. The root is an ingredient in many herbal remedies, as it not only possesses medicinal virtues of its own, but it also appears to enhance the potency of other herbs. Goldenseal has also found its way into modern medicine as a treatment for inflamed eyes, and some drug manufacturers include an alkaloid extracted from the root in their eye drops.

Once common in eastern North America, Goldenseal has almost become extinct in many places by commercial harvesting, and the plant was cited on the CITES list for protection and conservation, making it a rare and expensive commodity. Some of Goldenseal’s constituents include alkaloids (hydrastine, berberine, canadine and hydrastanine), tannins, beta-carotene, fatty acids, resin, albumin, essential oil, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium selenium, zinc, vitamins A, C and E and B-vitamins.

Lemon Essential Oil

Fresh Lemons

The virtues of the lemon and its close relative, the citron, have been well-known throughout history. The poet Virgil had this to say:

And dulling tastes of happy Citron fruit, Than which, no helpe more present can be had, If any time stepmothers worse than brute have poyson’d pots, and mingled herbs of sute With hurtfull charmes: this Citron fruit doth chase Blacke venome from the body in every place.

Writing in her 1931 book on herbal medicine, Maude Grieve says, “The lemon is the most valuable of all fruit for preserving health.” This was written in the days before aromatherapy, so Grieve couldn’t have had complete knowledge of the importance of lemon essential oil. She wrote, “The oil is not very active, and is used chiefly for flavouring.”

Aromatherapy

Like many essential oils, the constituents of lemon oil have antiseptic properties. What makes these properties noteworthy in lemon oil is that here they’re combined with a delightful aroma. Lemon is a great modifier for medicinal-smelling oils like tea tree and eucalyptus. Lemon works synergistically on a therapeutic, aesthetic and emotional level. This is very important when working with blends containing strongly medicinal oils, which may have a tendency to produce a negative aesthetic or emotional effect in aroma-sensitive people.

Lemon oil is uplifting and cleansing. It replaces negative emotions by creating a cheerful atmosphere of freshness and purity. It can help dispel mental fatigue and psychological heaviness. The aroma of lemon can inspire increased concentration and awareness. A Japanese study suggested that after diffusing lemon oil throughout a busy office building, typing errors decreased by 54%.

Because lemon oil is clarifying and aids the decision making process, it’s called the rational oil. Lemon is associated with the color yellow, with light and warm, penetrating energy. Simply placing a drop or two of lemon on a tissue can produce marvelous results. It’s a great addition to gently uplifting aromatherapy blends, along with other citrus oils as well as lavender and neroli.

Safety

Lemon oil is powerfully astringent and antiseptic. Because it can cause skin irritation if used by sensitive individuals in dilutions exceeding 5%, it should not be applied undiluted to skin. Five drops or less of lemon oil should be added to a teaspoon of a carrier oil. Lemon oil can contain up to two percent furanocoumarin compounds, including bergaptene. These compounds act as photosensitizing agents, which can increase the skin’s sensitivity to ultraviolet light, causing accelerated burning and skin damage. Don’t use lemon oil on the skin in the presence of sunlight.

**Courtesy of Aura Cacia

Recap: Today we discussed the herbs Oregon Graperoot, Goldenseal and Lemon essential oil. We made Tincture of Goldenseal and Lemon & Tea Tree Antiseptic Spray.

Looking ahead: Next week we will end our series on Cuts & Scrapes with a look at deeper wounds requiring a Poultice and Wound-healing Tea. We will look more in-depth at Plantain, Astragulus and Baptisia

Reminder: Have on hand fresh Comfrey or Plantain leaves, Astragalus root, Baptisia Root and Echinacea Root.

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Until next post…

Blessings to you and yours,

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